UTSPORTS.COM HOME
Buy Tickets Tenn Fund
ALERT
BUTCH JONES NAMED VOLS' NEW FOOTBALL COACH. CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY »
Lindsey Nelson Stadium

Renovations

In 2006, the University of Tennessee unveiled a plan to transform Lindsey Nelson Stadium into a premier baseball facility that will enable the Vols to compete at a championship level.

The Campaign for Tennessee Baseball was created in a phased approach. Each phase is independent to ensure fiscal responsibility, and no university funds or taxpayer subsidies are planned to be used in financing the anticipated $16 million in renovations.

Lindsey Nelson Stadium elevation

The Campaign for Tennessee Baseball calls for $16 million in renovations to Lindsey Nelson Stadium. Visit the Tennessee Fund homepage to join the Campaign for Tennessee Baseball.

Phase I was completed in time for the 2009 baseball season. This phase included $400,000 improvements to the field and expanded seating down the first base line.

A new team locker room, club area, weight room, and training room were also constructed to enhance the facilities used by players to prepare for games. Phase I also included new coach and administrative offices and a plaza above the right field line seating to provide an easy gathering space for fans and additional concessions and restrooms.

Phase II renovations were completed for the 2010 season. This phase included the construction of 370 MVP Field Level seats, which are designed to bring fans closer to the game than ever before while also providing a meaningful contribution to the Campaign for Tennessee Baseball.

Located directly behind home plate, these seats feature chairback seating with cup holders and access to an interior club room where fans can enjoy refreshments prior to and during the game. New batting cages will be constructed along the right field line with a playground above the cages for children to enjoy during the game. This phase also includes improvements to the visiting team locker room and a brick facade on the field interior.

Future phases of renovations include the construction of 16 luxury suites, a new press box tower, a left field entrance plaza, and expanded permanent seating on the left field side. The construction of these projects will begin once funding has been obtained through private leadership donations and MVP Field Level seat contributions.

About Lindsey Nelson

Lindsey Nelson

Legendary sports broadcaster Lindsey Nelson (center) is a Ford C. Frick Award winner and spent 17 seasons as the New York Mets' play-by-play announcer.

The University of Tennessee's baseball facility is named in honor of one of the school's most distinguished alums.

The late broadcasting legend Lindsey Nelson, a native of Columbia, Tenn., began his storied association with his alma mater in the late 1930s as an undergraduate.

He served as a student assistant to legendary Tennessee football coach Gen. Robert R. Neyland, started the Vol Radio Network in 1949 and later assumed the post of sports information director in 1951.

Nelson moved to the national network level in the 1950s, announcing college football and professional baseball for the Liberty Broadcasting Network.

The staggering list of sporting events broadcast by Nelson on radio and television includes the World Series, the Davis Cup, the Masters, the National Open, the Rose, Cotton and Sugar Bowls, the NFL Championship Game, the NBA Championships and the NIT Tournament.

His ties to baseball are legendary as he served as the New York Mets' lead broadcaster for 17 seasons and as the voice of the San Francisco Giants for three campaigns.

He was named National Sportscaster of the Year on five occasions, and has been inducted into no less that 12 halls of fame throughout the nation.

Nelson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum at Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1988, the New York Mets' Hall of Fame at Shea Stadium, the State of New York Sports Hall of Fame, the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame in Salisbury, N.C., the American Sportscasters Hall of Fame in New York City, the Mutual Broadcasting Hall of Fame in Nashville, the East Tennessee Hall of Fame for the Performing Arts in Knoxville, the College Football Hall of Fame, the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, and the LSU Athletic Hall of Fame in Baton Rouge, La.

Ground Rules and Field Information

Ground Rules:

1. The field at Lindsey Nelson Stadium is completely enclosed. The only way a ball can leave the field is in the dugout area, over the fence or through the gate.

2. Dugout Limitation: Any ball that rolls over the top and into the dugout is a dead ball. All of the tartan lip is live. If the ball hits any part of the dugout, it is a dead ball.

3. The foul poles, flag pole, light standards and scoreboard are all outside the park.

4. The backstop does not have any apparent holes, but the padding has spaces that the ball can lodge in, which would result in a dead ball and book rule applied.

5. Benches in bullpen are live.

6. Tarp Area: Any ball that lodges under, behind or in the cylinder of the tarp is dead. A player may have one knee on the tarp to make a catch.

7. Players are not allowed to warm up or hit pepper in the dugout area.

Field Information:

Capacity: 4,283

Dimensions: L-320, LC-360, C-404, RC-358, R-330

Fence Height: 10.5 feet

First Game: Feb. 23, 1993 - Tennessee 14, East Tennessee State 5

Largest Crowd: 5,086 vs. Oklahoma State, May 28, 1995

Directions to Lindsey Nelson Stadium

From McGhee Tyson Airport: Turn north on U.S. Highway 129 leaving airport. After crossing the Tennessee River bridge just outside of Knoxville, exit onto Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153). Turn left (south) at the bottom of the exit ramp and follow road until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn left at stoplight. Follow Chamique Holdsclaw Drive to stadium area.

From I-40 east (from Nashville) and I-75 north (from Chattanooga): Follow I-40 and I-75 to I-40/I-75 junction in west Knoxville. Continue on I-40 east to U.S. Highway 129 south. Follow 129 south to the exit for Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153). Turn left (south) at the bottom of the exit ramp and follow the road until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn left at stoplight. Follow Chamique Holdsclaw Drive to stadium area.

From I-40 west (from Asheville, N.C.): Follow I-40 west to the James White Parkway exit and exit to the left. Follow Parkway to Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153) until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn right onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn left at stoplight. Follow Chamique Holdsclaw Drive to stadium area.

From I-75 south (from Lexington, Ky.): Follow I-75 south to I-275 south just past Merchants Road. Follow I-275 to I-40 east. Exit I-40 east onto James White Parkway and follow Parkway to Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153) until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left at stoplight. Follow Chamique Holdsclaw Drive to stadium area.

Campus Maps

Seating Chart

Lindsey Nelson Seating Chart

All facilities and facilities projects at the University of Tennessee are supported by donations to the Tennessee Fund and season tickets.

For more information on how you can help support Tennessee Athletics, visit the Tennessee Fund homepage for more information.

Official Online Store

This week on sale:

    Tennessee Auction

    BID NOW! >>