UTSPORTS.COM HOME
Buy Tickets Tenn Fund
ALERT
BUTCH JONES NAMED VOLS' NEW FOOTBALL COACH. CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY »
Neyland Stadium




The present day Neyland Stadium, Shields-Watkins Field, had its beginning in 1919. Col. W.S. Shields, president of Knoxville's City National Bank and a UT trustee, provided the initial capital to prepare and equip an athletic field. Thus, when the field was completed in March 1921, it was called Shields-Watkins Field in honor of the donor and his wife, Alice Watkins-Shields.

The stadium, apart from the field it grew to enclose, came to bear its own distinguished name - Neyland Stadium. It was named for the man most responsible for the growth and development of Tennessee's proud football tradition. General Robert R. Neyland served as head coach from 1926-1952, with two interruptions for military service.

After retiring from the coaching ranks, Neyland was athletics director until his death in 1962. He was the guiding force behind several additions to the stadium's capacity and is the man most responsible for the winning tradition that Volunteer fans have come to expect through the years.

The latest addition to the facility are the 78 East sideline skyboxes in 2000, bringing capacity to 104,079.

QUICK FACTS

The Sporting News ranked Neyland Stadium as the nation's No.1 college football stadium in a poll in the spring of 2001

  • Tennessee set a school-record by averaging 107,595 fans in 2000.
  • A record total of 747,870 fans in seven games saw the Vols post an undefeated home season in 1999.
  • UT has averaged 105,176 fans over the past nine seasons, drawing nearly four million patrons during that span.

Capacity:
104,079 - Largest football stadium in the South, third-largest college stadium in the country. Has undergone 16 additions/renovations since the West stands were built in 1921, seating 3200. Latest addition 78 executive suites completed in September 2000.

First game as Shields-Watkins Field:
Sept. 24, 1921 - Tennessee 27, Emory & Henry 0.

Dedication game as Neyland Stadium:
Oct. 20, 1962 - Alabama 27, Tennessee 7.

First game on artificial turf:
Sept. 14, 1968 - Tennessee 17, Georgia 17.

Final game on artificial turf:
Nov. 27, 1993 - Tennessee 62, Vanderbilt 14.

Attendance:
Since attendance records were first kept beginning in the 1946 season, more than 25 million fans have watched Big Orange football in Neyland Stadium. An average of 68,925 fans have attended 364 games in 58 years. That statistic is one that promises to climb each year, as Tennessee football enthusiasts pack the stadium each autumn Saturday the Vols are home. Average attendance has been on climb since 1946, when an average of 31,167 saw six home contests.

Tennessee success at Shields-Watkins Field:
In 82 seasons and 509 games, the Vols are 398-94-17 at home, a winning percentage of .799.

Consecutive home games without a loss:
55, beginning Oct. 3, 1925, with a 51-0 victory against Emory & Henry and ending Oct. 21, 1933, with a 12-6 loss to Alabama.

Consecutive home wins:
30, beginning Dec. 8, 1928, with a 13-12 win against Florida and ending Oct. 21, 1933, with a 12-6 loss to Alabama.

Consecutive home losses:
4, beginning Nov. 13, 1954, with a 14-0 loss to Florida and ending Oct. 8, 1955, with a 13-0 win against Chattanooga, beginning Sept. 10, 1988, with a 31-26 loss to Duke and ending Nov. 5, 1988, with a 10-7 win against Boston College.

Winning seasons:
Tennessee has had 73 winning seasons in 82 years at Shields-Watkins Field, including 35 undefeated years at home. The last team to go undefeated at home was the 1999 squad, which was 7-0 at Neyland Stadium.

STADIUM RECORD ATTENDANCE:
109,061 - Sept. 18, 2004 - Tennessee 30, Florida 28

FIRST NIGHT GAME AT NEYLAND STADIUM:
Sept. 16, 1972 - Tennessee 28, Penn State 21.


Arrow TOP NEYLAND STADIUM CROWDS

Rank

Date

Opponent

Attendance

1. Sept. 18, 2004 Florida 109,061

2.

Sept. 16, 2000

Florida

108,768

3. Sept. 21, 2002 Florida 108,722
4. Sept. 6, 2004 UNLV 108,625
5. Sept. 29, 2001 LSU 108,472
6. Sept. 2, 2000 Southern Mississippi 108,064
7. Oct. 2, 2004 Auburn 107,828
8. Sept. 1, 2001 Syracuse 107,725
9. Oct. 21, 2000 Alabama 107,709
10. Sept. 7, 2002 MTSU 107,672
 


Arrow HOW NEYLAND STADIUM GREW

Year
Addition
Capacity Change
Total Capacity
1921
Original West Stands
3200 seats
3200
1926
East Stands
3600 seats
6800
1929
West Stands
11,060 seats
17,860
1937
North Section X
1500 seats
19,360
1938
East Stands
12,030 seats
31,390
1948
South Stands
15,000 seats
46,390
1962
West Upper Deck
press box, 5837 seats
52,227
1966
North Stands
5895 seats
58,122
1968
East Upper Deck
6307 seats
64,429
1972
Southwest Upper Deck
6221 seats
70,650
1976
Southeast Upper Deck
9600 seats
80,250
1980
North Stands
net gain 10,999 seats
91,249
1987
West Executive Suites
42 suites
91,110
1990
Student Seating Adjustment
792 seats
91,902
1996
North Upper Deck
10,642 seats
102,544
1997
ADA Seating Adjustment
310 seats
102,854
2000
East Executive Suites
78 suites
104,079


Arrow OTHER INFORMATION
No bottles, cans, cameras, umbrellas, coolers or stadium chairs with arms are allowed in Neyland Stadium. The use of intoxicating liquors in the stadium is prohibited. All articles are subject to search.

All persons, regardless of age, must have a ticket. No pass out checks will be issued.

WILL CALL
The will call booth is located at Gate 21 in the northwest corner of Neyland Stadium. It opens two hours prior to kickoff. Photo ID will be required.

TENNESSEE PLAYER FAMILY WILL CALL
The will call booth for Tennessee players' families is located at Gate 11 in the southwest corner of Neyland Stadium. It opens two hours prior to kickoff. Photo ID will be required.

VISITOR PLAYER FAMILY WILL CALL
The will call booth for visiting players' families is located at Gate 22 in the northeast corner of Neyland Stadium. It opens two hours prior to kickoff. Photo ID will be required.


Arrow DIRECTIONS TO THE STADIUM
From airport: Turn north on U.S. Highway 129 leaving airport. After crossing the Tennessee River bridge just outside of Knoxville, exit onto Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153). Turn left (south) at the bottom of the exit ramp and follow road until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

From I-40 east (from Nashville) and I-75 north (from Chattanooga): Follow I-40 and I-75 to I-40/I-75 junction in west Knoxville. Continue on I-40 east to U.S. Highway 129 south. Follow 129 south to the exit for Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153). Turn left (south) at the bottom of the exit ramp and follow the road until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

From I-40 west (from Asheville, N.C.): Follow I-40 west to the James White Parkway exit and exit to the left. Follow Parkway to Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153) until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn right onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

From I-75 south (from Lexington, Ky.): Follow I-75 south to I-275 south just past Merchants Road. Follow I-275 to I-40 east. Exit I-40 east onto James White Parkway and follow Parkway to Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153) until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn right onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

Arrow TELEPHONES
Telephones are located at intervals along the concourse in the North, South, East and West stands and upper decks.

Arrow FIRST AID STATIONS
In case of a medical emergency during a game, the University of Tennessee and the American Red Cross have established four first-aid stations in Neyland Stadium located in section Q, section LL, section X1, and section YY6. The stations are staffed with medical doctors, nurses and other qualified personnel. Trained first-aid teams are located throughout the stadium, ready to administer immediate care. If you need medical assistance, notify the team nearest you. If you are unable to locate a team, find a law enforcement officer or usher and he or she will direct you. This is a service provided by the University of Tennessee and the American Red Cross, a United Way agency.

Arrow RESTROOMS
Restrooms are located under the concourse in the West, South, East and North stands. Upper deck restrooms are located in the concourse. Ushers will direct you to the closest facility.

Arrow LOST AND FOUND
Lost articles may be turned in at the Gate 21 elevators. Such items will then be turned over to the University of Tennessee Security Office, 1115 UT Drive, where they may be called for Monday following each game by dialing 865-974-3114.

 
Official Online Store

This week on sale:

    Tennessee Auction

    BID NOW! >>

    Printroom Photo Store
    Replay Photo Store
    Vol Network Promotions
    Vol Network Promotions