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    Todd Raleigh 35    
     
      Todd Raleigh
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Raleigh File | Coaching Record | What they are saying

Todd Raleigh is in his fourth year at the helm of the University of Tennessee baseball program after assuming the reins as head coach on June 21, 2007.

An intensive national search headed by UT Athletics Director Mike Hamilton in the summer of 2007 culminated in the declaration that Raleigh was the singular clear choice as the beacon who could successfully usher the Volunteers program into and well beyond its centennial season.

Over the past three seasons, the Volunteers have steadily moved up in the postseason NCAA RPI, improving from 91 in 2008 to 58 in 2009 and a year-end ranking of 45 in 2010.

Todd Raleigh coaching third base against Texas.
Raleigh arrived at Rocky Top boasting a reputation as one of the country's premier hitting coaches, and he has continued to solidify his reputation as an offensive savant during his first three years at UT. In the last two seasons alone, the Vols have belted out 168 round-trippers, good for the second-most prolific two-year period in school history.

In addition, UT has been one of the best defensive teams in the nation over that same time-frame, posting fielding percentages of .972 and .974 in 2009 and 2010, respectively.

Individually, former Vol Cody Hawn has been the greatest beneficiary of Raleigh's tutelage, becoming just the 10th player in program history to win the team Triple Crown in 2009 and finishing his collegiate career ranked third in the school annals with 36 home runs, trailing just Sonny Cortez (1996, 98) and Tennessee legend Todd Helton who hit 38 from 1993-95.

While at UT, Raleigh has had 12 players drafted, including two in 2008 and five more in both 2009 and 2010, and two more sign free-agent contracts following the completion of their eligibility. Nine of those players were drafted in the top-20 rounds, highlighted by 2009 first-round selection Kentrail Davis. In 19 seasons as a collegiate coach, Raleigh has now produced a total of 45 MLB draft picks and 63 professional players.

The 2010 campaign was undoubtedly Raleigh's best at Rocky Top so far, as the Big Orange were in the hunt for a postseason bid until the very end before finishing with an overall record of 30-26, including eight victories over NCAA Tournament squads.

Tennessee ended the season with some of the best numbers in school history in several categories. As a team, the Vols hit a total of 81 home runs and had a fielding percentage of .974, placing them third in the UT record books in both categories.

Todd Raleigh gives instruction to Cody Brown.
Less than two weeks into his first year at Tennessee, Raleigh guided the Vols to a stunning upset win over then-No. 3 Texas at Minute Maid Park in Houston. The come-from-behind triumph at a big-league ballpark packed with nearly 7,500 vocal Longhorns fans showcased the type of fight and effort by which Raleigh's Tennessee clubs have come to be known.

And that marquee win was just the first of many highlights in Raleigh's first season at Tennessee.

He arrived at Rocky Top boasting a reputation as one of the country's premier hitting coaches, and after just one season under his tutelage, numerous Vols could attest that Raleigh's reputation was well-earned. In total, seven returning players on Raleigh's first UT team increased their overall batting averages from the previous season. Several Vols also saw their power numbers rise, as four players increased their home run production, and eight improved upon their slugging percentage from the previous season.

As a team, Tennessee significantly improved its home run and slugging totals in 2008. By clubbing 67 home runs in just 56 games, UT posted the fifth-highest single-season total in program history. It was just one homer shy of the 2005 College World Series team's 67-game total. All this despite the loss of three first-round draft picks as well as a sixth-round pick off the 2007 club.

And despite a lineup that regularly featured seven underclassmen, the 2008 Vols went on to post impressive wins at BIG EAST champion Louisville and against Atlantic 10 champion Charlotte. In SEC play, UT notched series victories over LSU, Florida and Alabama--all of which advanced to the NCAA Tournament. Tennessee's impressive sweep over LSU, which won the SEC Western Division title and reached the College World Series, marked the Vols' first-ever three-game sweep against the perennial power from Baton Rouge, La. A total of 16 of Tennessee's wins in 2008 came against teams that earned NCAA Regional berths.

For the second straight season his squad made dramatic improvements offensively, as it clubbed 87 home runs in just 55 games, the second-highest single-season total in school history, in addition to increasing its slugging percentage from .447 in 2008 to .484 in 2009.

Although it got off to a rough start during its 100th year of varsity baseball, Tennessee finished the 2009 campaign strong with 10 wins in its final 18 games, including series victories over Mississippi State, Vanderbilt and eventual SEC and NCAA National Champion LSU. In all, the Volunteers finished with an overall record of 26-29, including 12 victories over teams that earned NCAA Regional berths. Making that accomplishment even more impressive was the fact that Raleigh routinely fielded a lineup that included six or more freshmen or sophomores.

An outstanding eight-year head coaching tenure at Western Carolina lifted Raleigh into the national spotlight and set the stage for his introduction as Tennessee's 23rd all-time head coach. During his eight seasons in Cullowhee, N.C., Raleigh's clubs won two regular-season Southern Conference championships, one Southern Conference tournament title, turned in five top-three league finishes and made two NCAA Regional appearances - reaching the regional final both times. He also was named the 2002 and 2007 Southern Conference Coach of the Year.

One of the many strengths Hamilton saw in Raleigh was the young coach's willingness to play a highly competitive schedule against the region's top programs. Games against Southeastern Conference and Atlantic Coast Conference teams were regular staples in the Catamounts' schedule during Raleigh's tenure. Upon his departure from Western Carolina, Raleigh had won three of his last five meetings with Georgia, three of his last four meetings with Georgia Tech (including a win over the top-ranked Yellow Jackets in 2005) and two of his last four meetings against Clemson.

In 2006, Raleigh's club was the only team in the nation to record non-conference road wins over a pair of College World Series teams, winning at both Clemson and Georgia.

And his 2007 Southern Conference championship squad posted a winning record against teams in the top 35 of the RPI. Upon being awarded a rare mid-major at-large bid to the field of 64 for the 2007 NCAA tournament, Western Carolina - which worked itself into a top 40 national RPI slot - was touted by ESPN college baseball analyst Kyle Peterson as featuring an "SEC-style offense."

Upon his hiring at Tennessee in June 2007, many around the national baseball landscape had already taken notice of Raleigh's steady rise through the ranks.

"Wins and losses are the standard for measuring a coach," said Doug Harris, Texas Rangers East Coast Cross-Checker. "But the highest compliment I feel a coach can receive deals with his ability to reach and connect with his team and get the most out of them as individuals. As his track record shows, and the university will see going forward, Todd brings this immeasurable trait."

Chip Smith, Raleigh's Athletics Director at Western Carolina, echoed those sentiments when recounting Raleigh's tenure at WCU. Smith also lauded the academic prowess of Raleigh's student-athletes.

"He's a player's coach," Smith said. "After they leave the program, his players come back and thank him for the positive impact he's had on their lives. He's a team player. He doesn't take a lot of credit, but he works to get the job done.

"He did a great job with academics, and his kids do a good job in the classroom. He takes the APR very seriously and has a very good graduation rate. He makes it clear that the student-athletes are there to get an education. And he doesn't rely on administrators or counselors to make that point, he takes it on himself and the players respond."

Before Western Carolina presented Raleigh with his first head coaching opportunity in 2000, he spent eight years developing his leadership philosophy during successive stints on collegiate staffs at Vermont, Western Carolina, Belmont Abbey (Division II), James Madison and East Carolina.

But Raleigh's longstanding relationship with the game of college baseball began with a humble hitch-hiking trek from his hometown of Swanton, Vt., all the way to the Western Carolina campus in Cullowhee, where he walked on to play for young up-and-coming head coach Jack Leggett.

Todd Raleigh and current Clemson head coach Jack Leggett.
"That just shows what he's all about," Leggett, the current head coach at Clemson, said. "He came to Western Carolina sight-unseen, no scholarship, just wanting an opportunity. He got a ride part-way down, got left off and hitch-hiked the rest of the way down. He's just blue-collar. What you see is what you get. That's why I've got so much respect for him. He's never had anything handed to him, and he hasn't expected any handouts in his whole life. He gets by on work ethic, being honest, and looking you in the eye."

Raleigh starred behind the plate at WCU from 1988-91, and his association with Leggett developed into a friendship that would continue to blossom as Raleigh later went on to establish himself in the college coaching ranks.

"I've known Todd for a long period of time," Leggett said. "He was a great player for us at Western Carolina, and he's a great person. He's one of the best leaders and captains I've ever had in all my time coaching. I've known him as a coach and competed against him, and Tennessee has the right man.

"His teams are aggressive, very tough, fundamentally sound and extremely competitive. Let's just put it this way, if you're going to play Todd Raleigh's team, you better have your `A-Game.' He's just a competitive, hard-nosed person, and his teams take on that same personality."

Todd and his brother Matt during playing days at Western Carolina.
A stirring passion for the game drove Raleigh to excel as a collegian. He was a two-time All-SoCon selection, including first-team honors as a senior in 1991. He held the WCU and Southern Conference single-season RBIs record with 78 until 2000. Raleigh was named the Catamounts' Most Valuable Player as a senior and signed a professional baseball contract with the Boston Red Sox after graduation, playing in the Florida State League that summer.

But it was coaching - teaching young men the game - that Raleigh felt most drawn to, and he landed his first full-time coaching job in 1992 at the University of Vermont (where Leggett had coached prior to taking the job at Western Carolina).

After one season working in his home state, a coaching opportunity arose back at Western Carolina, and Raleigh returned to his alma mater as an assistant for two more seasons. During his six combined seasons as a player and assistant coach at Western Carolina, Raleigh helped the Cats capture four Southern Conference championships - two each as a player and coach - and advance to four NCAA Regionals. He helped coach the 1994 squad to a league best .295 team batting average.

His ascent up the coaching ladder continued in 1996, when he landed the top assistant position at James Madison.

There he served as the hitting, outfield and catching coach; he also served as interim head coach for two months during the 1997 season. Raleigh's implemented batting techniques helped the Dukes lead the Colonial Athletic Association in hitting four times. He also held the title of JMU's recruiting coordinator, and two of his signing classes were ranked among the nation's top 30 during his tenure in Harrisonburg, Va. James Madison finished in the top three of the CAA three times in Raleigh's four seasons on staff there.

Raleigh's final assistant coaching stop was a one-year stint at East Carolina University, where he worked as hitting instructor and recruiting coordinator on the staff of the late Keith LeClair in 1999. Raleigh's impact was immediate, as the Pirates won the CAA championship, earned a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament and finished the year with a No. 18 national ranking.

That 1999 campaign marked Raleigh's eighth year in the assistant coaching ranks, but he had done more than enough to prove himself ready to lead his own program. Fittingly it was his alma mater that came calling, beckoning him back to Cullowhee for a third time.

His first season at the reins resulted in a modest 15 wins and a 10th place SoCon finish. But Raleigh was quick to right the ship in 2001 and led the Catamounts to the biggest single-season turnaround in Southern Conference history, improving by 14.5 games to post a 30-26 (18-11 SoCon) record while tying for a third-place league finish. That success came without the benefit of a single senior on the squad, Raleigh relied primarily on sophomores and freshmen, as WCU led the league in team batting average (.311), slugging percentage (.473) and doubles (143), while finishing second in home runs (56).

The 2002 season brought even more improvement, as WCU turned in a second-place conference finish with a 33-23 (20-10 SoCon) mark. Raleigh was recognized as the 2002 Southern Conference Coach of the Year for his efforts, but he was still plenty hungry.

The 2003 campaign capped an impressive four-year resurgence at Western, as Raleigh steered the Cats from an 8-22 league record in 2000 to a SoCon-best 22-8 league mark and an NCAA Regional final in 2003. In the process, he was tabbed the 2003 North Carolina Baseball Coaches Association College Coach of the Year.

Western went 43-21 overall and 22-8 in the SoCon in 2003, with the 43 wins marking the fourth-highest season total in WCU history. Raleigh's squad also produced a school-record 25-3 home record. Included was a 9-5 upset of 10th-ranked Clemson in what was the first-ever home night game for the Cats. Western later went on to claim 12-5 and 15-9 victories at 26th-ranked Oklahoma State. The OSU wins came in the midst of a 10-game win streak by Western, propelling the Cats to a season-high ranking of No. 26 in the Collegiate Baseball Newspaper national poll.

In the 2003 NCAA Wilson Regional, Western Carolina split its first two games before using a one-hitter to down 19th-ranked Virginia Commonwealth. Western then faced 12th-ranked and regional host N.C. State, and the Cats battled the Wolfpack before falling 6-4 in the 14th inning of the regional final.

Raleigh lost a substantial amount of talent heading into the 2004 season and was faced with the prospect of replacing SoCon Player of the Year Alan Beck, three-time All-SoCon pick Todd Buchanan, All-SoCon selection and WCU doubles record holder Rod Goldston, WCU all-time saves leader Ryan Foster, seventh-round MLB draft pick Ryan Basner and career 17-game winner Seth Foster. Raleigh's club never yielded, however, notching an upset win over eventual ACC champion Georgia Tech and reeling off a late six-game win streak to qualify for the conference tournament despite season-ending injuries to multiple players on his roster.

The hard-luck Catamounts mounted an inspiring run in that 2004 SoCon Tournament, catching the attention of the baseball world by upsetting 30th-ranked and No. 1 seed College of Charleston, 4-3, in the first round to make WCU just the fourth team to hand a top seed a loss in the first round. After a 7-6 triumph over Elon in the second round, Western shocked host team The Citadel, 5-2. That victory marked the first loss the Bulldogs suffered to a SoCon team on their home field in 2004 and made WCU just the second No. 8 seed ever to reach the SoCon championship game without a loss. However, The Citadel managed wins on back-to-back days to end Western's run and earn the SoCon's NCAA automatic bid.

By the conclusion of WCU's 2004 campaign, those in baseball circles around the region were well aware of the Cats prowess on the diamond, and Raleigh's teams went on to post a pair of top-three league finishes in his final three seasons, including that 2007 league title in what would become his final year leading his alma mater's program.

Developing individual talent was a staple of Raleigh's tenure at WCU. Under his watch, the Cats produced 24 All-SoCon selections (including six in 2007), 11 Major League draft picks (including a school-record-tying five in 2007) and three SoCon Players of the Year. Donovan Minero twice led the Southern Conference in home runs, ranked 12th nationally in RBIs as a junior and was a third-team All-America honoree in 2001.

Raleigh also served as a driving force behind numerous facility improvements to WCU's Ronnie G. Childress Field at Hennon Stadium. During his head coaching tenure, the facility had its playing surface and locker room redone, new lights were installed and a famed "Purple Monster" was erected rising as tall as 20 feet in the outfield.

Raleigh earned his bachelor's degree from WCU in 1991 and obtained his master's in 1994. He is married to the former Stephanie Deitz of Sylva, N.C., and the couple has four children: Caleb John "Cal" (13), Emma Grace (11), Carley Elizabeth (4) and Todd Anthony "T" (1).

THE TODD RALEIGH FILE
Full Name: Todd Anthony Raleigh
Born: March 27, 1969
Hometown: Swanton, Vt.
Family: Married to the former Stephanie Deitz of Sylva, N.C. The couple has three children: Caleb John "Cal" (12), Emma Grace (10) and Carley (3).
Education: Bachelor of Science - Sport management (Western Carolina University, 1991); Master of Science - College administration (Western Carolina University, 1994)
Playing Experience: Western Carolina University, 1988-91; Boston Red Sox organization, 1991 (catcher)
Coaching Experience: Assistant coach at University of Vermont (1992); Assistant coach at Western Carolina University (1993-94); Assistant coach at Belmont Abbey College (Division II) (1994); Assistant coach at James Madison University (1995-98); Assistant coach at East Carolina University (1999); Head coach at Western Carolina University (2000-2007); Head coach at University of Tennessee (2008-present)

RALEIGH'S HEAD COACHING HISTORY
YEARSCHOOL OVERALL PCT. CONF. PCT. FINISH NOTES
2000 WCU 15-38 .283 8-22 .267 10th
2001 WCU 30-26 .536 18-11 .621 T-3rd Largest single-season turnaround in SoCon history (+14.5 games)
2002 WCU 33-23 .589 20-10 .667 2nd SoCon Coach of the Year
2003 WCU 43-21 .672 22-8 .733 1st SoCon Regular Season Champs; SoCon Tournament Champs; NCAA Regional
2004 WCU 28-31 .475 12-18 .400 8th
2005 WCU 33-23 .589 18-12 .600 3rd
2006 WCU 33-27 .550 14-13 .519 6th
2007 WCU 42-20 .677 20-7 .741 1st SoCon Regular Season Champs; NCAA Regional; SoCon Coach of the Year
2008 UT 27-29 .482 12-18 .400 6th East
2009 UT 26-29 .473 11-19 .367 6th East
2010UT30-26.53612-18.4005th East

TOTALS 340-293 .537 167-156 .517

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WHAT THEY'RE SAYING ABOUT TODD RALEIGH
"Todd is a very good baseball coach, but really he is just a tremendous person. He's got great passion for the game of baseball and great compassion for the kids. He's been at Western Carolina where a lot of my friends -- including the guy who hired me (as a coach), Jack Leggett, and Keith LeClair, who passed away from Lou Gehrig's Disease -- we've all been in that inner circle of friends in baseball. And it's great to see Todd get this opportunity, because he's deserving of it."

Tim Corbin, Head Baseball Coach (Vanderbilt)


"I'm so happy and excited for Todd and his family. To know that he's going to my alma mater makes me extremely proud. Todd is a truly wonderful man and a great coach, and I think it will be a great fit.

"I've enjoyed watching how he interacts with his players, because as a coach you're always looking for ways to improve your own team. His teams' discipline was remarkable. As a coach I've tried to learn from him on how he disciplines and how he runs his program. On and off the field, his kids are impressive.

"The respect that everyone has for Todd is enormous. He's blue-collar, and I don't think you can get any better than that."

-- Kellie Harper, Head Women's Basketball Coach (North Carolina State)
(Former Lady Vol basketball player under maiden name Kellie Jolly)


"First of all, I'd like to congratulate the University of Tennessee on a terrific hire. I think the university, its players and fans will find Todd brings many qualities that will further the program, the young men and those who are associated with him. He brings tremendous passion and energy and is an excellent teacher and leader. His past success is a result of a long list of attributes he possesses, and he will make the University of Tennessee proud to have him as the program moves forward.

"Wins and losses are the standard for measuring a coach, but the highest compliment I feel a coach can receive deals with his ability to reach and connect with his team and get the most out of them as individuals. As his track record shows, and the university will see going forward, Todd brings this immeasurable trait.

"Tennessee got great person and a tremendous baseball man. I have three daughters -- I don't have a young boy at home -- but if I did I'd be very selective of where I'd send him. But I'd give my son to Todd any day of the week."

-- Doug Harris, East Coast Cross-Checker (Texas Rangers)


"I've known Todd for a long period of time. He was a great player for us at Western Carolina, and he's a great person. He's one of the best leaders and captains I've ever had in all my time coaching. I've known him as a coach and competed against him, and Tennessee has the right man.

"He's extremely hard-working, he's got great toughness and competitive spirit, a great work ethic, and he'll have a great rapport with the players. I know that everybody in the Southeastern Conference right now is going to respect the choice that (athletic director Mike Hamilton) made. Todd's a great fit for that job. He's one of the best young coaches out there and one of the most passionate people in the baseball coaching field that you could find.

"I just know on thing ... when you play his teams, you better strap it on. He's a tremendously hard worker and is going to do a great job for the University of Tennessee. They've got a lot to be excited about in Knoxville.

"His teams are aggressive, very tough, fundamentally sound and extremely competitive. Let's just put it this way, if you're going to play Todd Raleigh's team, you better have your 'A-Game.' He's just a competitive, hard-nosed person, and his teams take on that same personality. He expects things to be done right, and he expects things to be done fundamentally sound. He'll surround himself with great people.

"I've seen him do a lot at Western Carolina with very limited scholarships and resources. And with the commitment that Tennessee has toward its athletics and baseball program, I expect things there are going to take off in a real positive fashion. They made a tremendous choice.

On Raleigh hitch-hiking from Vermont to WCU: "That just shows what he's all about. He came to Western Carolina sight-unseen, no scholarship, just wanting an opportunity. He got a ride part way down, got left off and hitch-hiked the rest of the way down. He's just blue-collar. What you see is what you get. That's why I've got so much respect for him. He's never had anything handed to him, and he hasn't expected any handouts in his whole life. He gets by on work ethic and being honest, and looking you in the eye."

-- Jack Leggett, Head Baseball Coach (Clemson)


"Todd is a great individual. He did an exceptional job for Western Carolina. He's an alum, and he came back and took a program that wasn't doing as well as it could have to a new level and achieved great success. We'll miss him, but we congratulate him and wish him nothing but the best. We also congratulate the University of Tennessee on making a great decision to bring him in as head coach.

"He's a players' coach. After they leave the program, his players come back and thank him for the positive impact he's had on their lives. He's a team player. He doesn't take a lot of credit, but he works to get the job done.

"He did a great job with academics here, and his kids do a good job in the classroom. He takes the APR very seriously and has a very good graduation rate. He makes it clear that the student-athletes are there to get an education. And he doesn't rely on administrators or counselors to make that point, he takes it on himself and the players respond."

-- Chip Smith, Athletic Director (Western Carolina)

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